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  • Assembly
28/05/2018
Add to Calendar
29/05/2018
Gothenburg
  • Sweden

About: 

BEYOND MOBILITY: GOVERNING AND LEADING FOR CITIES

UITP (the International Association of Public Transport) is organizing  the 1st International Assembly for Public Transport Authorities (PTAs) on the 28th/29th May 2018 in Gothenburg - Sweden. 

Each year 3 million people die prematurely due to air pollution, which is particularly affecting large cities in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The World Health Organization estimates that air pollution causes one in three deaths from chronic respiratory diseases and different types of lung cancer, as well as one in four deaths from heart attack. In addition to air pollution, other important health risks may be linked to the car-based habits of urban dwellers, such as obesity, cardio-vascular diseases and other chronic diseases.

Beside individual behaviors and lifestyle, this  is the result of years of ill-decision making that systematically favored road infrastructures and cars regardless of the impacts. It is time to acknowledge that current urban mobility systems are dysfunctional, calling for radical change in the way we conceive them. This is all the more pressing that the mobility landscape is changing. It is now popular to share cars, bikes or even ride on an on-demand basis. A trend that could accelerate with the progress of autonomous vehicle and artificial intelligence, reducing the perceived need to own a car.  While technology constitutes an opportunity to lead urban mobility systems to a path that better serves societal and political goals, it is not self evident, it requires Governance and Leadership from Public Transport Authorities (PTAs).

As PTAs are at the heart of UITP multi-stakeholders community, representing a global network of 200+ members, this is an opportinity for them to meet and share practices. The emphasis is on diversity because context matters. There is no single one-fit all solution. Prescriptions are excluded, hence the need to learn from each other how to address the current challenges. This is the purpose of this 1st International Assembly.  
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On the programme:

  • Technology and Disruption– how to unleash New Players potential for a car-free city.
  • Health because integrated public transport policies contribute fighting the 21st century diseases related to pollution and sedentary lifestyle.
  • Quality and Performance to explore how to become customer-centric and innovate to equip cities with the best transport system.  
  • And finally a panel on Accessibility, Metropolitan Development and Land Value Capture

Speakers: 

  • Our host, Roger Vahnberg Senior Vice President at Västtrafik, Sweden and UITP President of the Organizing Authorities Assembly
  • Jeremy Yap, Deputy Chief Executive, Public Transport, Policy & Planning at LTA/ Singapore, and UITP Organizing Authorities Committee Chairman
  • Mohamed Mezghani, Secretary General, UITP, Brussels, Belgium
  • Tero Anttila, Transport Planning Director, Helsinki Region Transport (HSL), Finland
  • Antoine Belaieff, Director Regional Planning at Metrolinx, Toronto, Canada
  • Lars Backström, President, Västtrafik, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Maria Björner Brauer, Head of Sales and Marketing, Västtrafik, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Tommaso Bonino, Technical Manager, Bologna’s Mobility and Public Transport Agency, SRM, Italy
  • Caroline Cerfontaine, UITP Combined Mobility Manager, Brussels, Belgium
  • Carles Conill Vergés, Director of Sustainable Mobility Services, Director of Sustainable Mobility Services, Metropolitan Area of Barcelona (AMB), Spain
  • Dr. Carlos Dora, Coordinator Public Health and the Environment Department, World Health Organisation, Switzerland
  • Dr. Ludwig Desjardins, Deputy Director – Strategic planning, funding and fares, The Regional Authority for Metropolitan Transport , ARTM, Montreal, Canada
  • Dr. Caroline Fabianski, Senior Manager, UITP Organizing Authorities, Brussels, Belgium
  • Poon Joe Fai, Director, Policy (Bus & International Relations, Land Transport Authority (LTA), Singapore
  • Alan Fedda, Executive Director, Franchise Management for Public Transport Victoria (PTV), Australia 
  • Mette Granberg, Transport Planner, Helsinki Region Transport (HSL), Finland
  • Dr John Hultén, Director, K2, The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport, Lund, Sweden
  • Helena Leustafius, CEO, The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport, Lund, Sweden
  • Mäns Lönnroth, Expert, Volvo Research and Educational Foundation (VREF), Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Prof. Rosario Macario, UITP Consultant, TIS & CERIS – Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
  • Dr. Alexander Paulsson, Researcher, K2, The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport, Lund, Sweden
  • Tom Page, Head of Business Strategy,Transport for London, TfL, United Kingdom
  • Lucy Saunders, Public Health Specialist, Transport for London, TfL, United Kingdom
  • Simon Warburton, Strategy Director, Transport For Greater Manchester (TfGM), United Kingdom

Programme: 

1st DAY

Monday 28th May

Monday Morning

08:30

“Breaking the Ice” Coffee

   

09:00

Assembly Opening

  • Roger Vahnberg, Senior Vice President
   
 

Developing and Nurturing a Global Network for Public Transport Authorities within and beyond  UITP

  • Mohamed Mezghani, UITP General Secretary
   
 

Beyond Mobility: Governing and  Leading for Cities

  • Jeremy Yap, Deputy Chief Executive, Public Transport, Policy & Planning, Land Transport Authority (LTA), Singapore and UITP Organizing Authorities Committee Chairman,   
  • Roger Vahnberg, Senior Vice President, Västtrafik, Gothenburg and President of the UITP Organizing Authorities Assembly
   

09:30

Welcome to Sweden – Host Session

Doubling the ridership in Gothenburg

  • Roger Vahnberg, Senior Vice President, Västtrafik, Gothenburg
   
 

How Västtrafik organizes for the modal shift? Partnering with operators

  • Lars Backström, President, Västtrafik, Gothenburg
  • Roger Vahnberg, Senior Vice President, Västtrafik, Gothenburg
  • Maria Björner Brauer, Head of Sales and Marketing, Västtrafik, Gothenburg

Abstract

The Vision of Gothenburg’s Region, Västra Götaland, is the Good Life. The region should be attractive and competitive but at the same time sustainable. Gothenburg Labour Market has to grow. More people will commute and in order to be sustainable an even higher share has to go with Public Transport. Doubling the ridership is a means to reach the Region´s Vision. To achieve this objective Västtrafik had to rethink the way it worked and change the organizational culture.  It went into partnership with all its operators and the partnership relies on three actions 1) Contracting for Innovation 2) Meeting the Customer Needs 3) Marketing and Communication

   
 

How to align stakeholders? The emergence of a vision.

  • Dr John Hultén, Director, K2
  • Helena Leufstadius, CEO, The Swedish Public Transport Association
  • Dr Alexander Paulsson, Researcher, K2

Abstract

PTAs and Academics will reflect on the emergence of the PTx2 Vision, introducing the concept of co-production. Co-production refers to stakeholder’s alignment. The session demonstrates that it is possible to create a positive and self-reinforcing culture for public transport that engages the whole nexus of stakeholders – i.e.: PTAs and operators, but also politicians and customers, with the goal of doubling the ridership.  

   

11:00

Coffee and Cakes

   

11:30

Plenary Session on Health

Increasing People Life Expectancy in Barcelona, Helsinki and London

Moderators to be confirmed

 

Setting the Scene

Urban Mobility Systems are dysfunctional to the point they now threaten people life expectancy (i.e: pollution, safety and accident as well as various chronic disease related to lifestyle). Transport structures space and shapes places, affecting people living conditions. And cars reliance generates an environment that negatively impacts the health of citizens. In fact, PTx2 scenarios would automatically lead to a more balanced modal split, reducing the percentage of trips made by car and increasing the relative use of active modes. UITP believes that part of the health solution consist of equipping cities and their inhabitants with integrated public transport because only cities with integrated public transport will offer an environment that enables people to safely choose walking or cycling – Yet, this is not a challenge that PTAs can solve on their own, it cuts across the boundaries of existing administrations and therefore requires a joint and coordinated action. 

 

How HSL synchronize with Land-Use and Housing for people health in Helsinki?   

  • Tero Anttila, Public Transport Planning Director, Helsinki Region Transport (HSL)
  • Mette Granberg, Transport Planner, Helsinki Region Transport (HSL)

Abstract

The Land Use, Housing and Transport Plan of Helsinki region (MAL 2019): In Helsinki region, transport is part of a long term strategic plan that considers land-use, housing and transport all together: the MAL 2019. To legitimise the MAL, Helsinki region draws on the most advanced knowledge and academic research and health, acknowledging 1) the multidirectional relationships between health outcomes and the way we travel 2) the need to adopt a person-centred perspective that reckons that individual health does depend on a multiplicity of environmental factor that act in combination. HSL is responsible for the preparation of the Helsinki Region Transport System Plan. In the MAL context, Helsinki’s PTAs, HSL works in close collaboratin with housing and land-use, crossing departmental boundaries and silos. The MAL supports HSL attitude because it is not a plan that prescribes what HSL’s should do but constitutes a synchronisation arrangement between the three parties.

 

How to plan for Barcelona’s Air Quality:

Speakers (tbc)

Abstract

 

How TFL Designs Healthy Streets in London?

  • Tom Page, Head of Business Strategy,Transport for London, TfL
  • Lucy Saunders, Public Health Specialist, Transport for London, TfL

Abstract

Healthy Street is a process, an urban design approach that put people’s health at the centre. This is an attitude that let London’s PTA, Transport for London (TfL) care about streets. It consists of 10 indicators which aim to create an environment in which everybody is able to participate in public life and where the healthiest and more environmentally transport mode is the first choice. These indicators are interdependent. To meet them, TFL adopts an iterative process where the designer engages with different stakeholders. This enables them to meet all the conditions for better streets for the citizens. Instead of conceiving the street design in one go, TfL does it step-by-step. The street design emerges over this process. In this way, there is not one street that is similar to another since they are constructed by people to fit the neighbourhood characteristics.  This approach is evaluative in essence since TfL can be consistent with the need of the people as the design develops.

   

13:00

Lunch

 

 

 

Monday Afternoon

14:00

Workshop on Quality and Performance

Placing the value on the customer side – When Italy and Australia meet, the Case of Melbourne from Bologna’s perspective.

  • Tommaso Bonino, Technical Manager, Bologna’s Mobility and Public Transport Agency, SRM
  • Dr. Caroline Fabianski, Senior Manager, UITP Organizing Authorities
 

The PTAs Assembly will be split in XXX groups. Tommaso Bonino will present the position/definition of  UITP when it comes to Quality and the Melbourne experience will be introduced  as a good practices

A Starting Point:  Defining Quality

There is two ways to see Quality and PerformanceQuality is traditionally seen as the result of a trade-off between cost/revenue/and compensations. The emphasis is on the production side and could be associated with the concept of Added Value. In this case the customer is seen as a passive receiver. An alternative approach would consist in placing quality on the customer side towards the Value in Use.  The Value in Use departs from the principle that the service must be attractive and relevant for people to choose public transport. Such standpoint would lead PTAs to systematically seek customers’ feedback and engage with them to reshape the service accordingly. Going further, adopting the Value in Use approach argues for co-creation – where the services are produced with the customer.  

14: 15

Melbourne Experience

Title to be confirmed

  • Alan Fedda, Executive Director, Franchise Management, Public Transport Victoria (PTV), Melbourne

Abstract

14:45

Briefing: Organisation of the Group Work

 

Each group will deal with a mode, rail or buses. After the coffee break the groups will change modes. Relating to UITP Position and Melbourne presentation the group will reflect on:  

  • How they engage  with the customers and adapt the services accordingly
  • Share practices related to their own context  

To Guide the discussion the participants might refer to approaches such as Design Thinking and technology such as digitalization can support the process.

At the end of the Group Work sessions we will sum up the findings.

15:00

Group Work – Rail and LRT vs. Bus and BRT

 

 

15: 30

Coffee and Cakes

 

 

16:00

Group Work  to be continued

 

 

16:30

Sharing Findings

 

 

17:00

End of the day – Break before the Dinner

   

17:45

Depart for the Dinner

Pensionat Styrsö Skäret http://pensionatskaret.se/en

Meeting point at the hotel Reception

Transportation by boat from the hotel to the restaurant (the trip takes about one hour), the return trip will be by public transport.

 

 

 

2nd Day

Tuesday 29th May

 

Tuesday Morning

9:00

Plenary Session on Disruption

Unleashing New Players potential for a car free city

  • Simon Warburton, Strategy Director, Transport For Greater Manchester (TfGM)
  • Caroline Cerfontaine, UITP Combined Mobility Manager

Setting the Scene

The mobility landscape is changing. Current technological development and innovations could trigger the restructuring of the Urban Mobility System as motorized transport – the car in particular, did in the past. Change is the result of long-term development processes of co-evolution between techniques and society. The public perception of shared goods has changed, the notion of sharing cars or even ride on an on-demand basis is now gaining widespread popularity. While still marginal in the modal split such novel practices constitute a niche market that might fundamentally transform cities and the way people move. This trend could accelerate, becoming even more eminent, if combined with the progress of autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence. At this point there is a need to point out the paradoxical character of the challenge.  While technology and innovation should be seen as an opportunity to turn dysfunctional Urban Mobility Systems into systems that would better serve societal and political goals, interestingly, the potential magnitude and pace of change also generate fear and resistance, questioning humankind ability to harness the transition for a better future. Indeed, regulators and decision-makers at different levels of government seem overwhelmed by the challenge, acknowledging that existing regulatory frameworks are inadequate but could also involve adverse effects if the adjustment effort is too fragmented, protracted or extensive.

How LTA nudges New Players to ensure that ¾ of peak hours travels will be made by Public Transport in Singapore?

  • Jeremy Yap, Deputy Chief Executive, Public Transport, Policy & Planning, Land Transport Authority (LTA), Singapore
  • Poon Joe Fai, Director, Policy (Bus & International Relations, Land Transport Authority (LTA), Singapore

Abstract

 

XXXXXXXX’s PTA Story:

Speakers

Abstract

 

XXXXXXXX’s PTA Story:

Speakers

Abstract

 

Question & Answer to the Speakers

10:30

Coffee

11:00

Plenary Session on Metropolitan Development  

Becoming an access provider

  • Prof. Rosario Macario, UITP Consultant, TIS & CERIS – Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa
  • Mäns Lönnroth, Expert, Volvo Research and Educational Foundation (VREF)

Setting the Scene

In this session we argue that we need to rethink how we plan and deliver transport infrastructures and services in relation to the city. This comprises the way we value their benefits at the institutional and societal level and how we communicate them. UITP calls for an accessibility perspective that considers transport and land development jointly to enable people to reach a wide range of opportunities.  In other words, it means that the provision of access should underpin transport interventions and the subsequent decision-making process. Going further, valuing access is essential to make the Land Value Capture (LVC) acceptable as a complementary funding channel for public transport. 

 

How Metrolinx catalyse development around stations access in Greater Toronto?

  • Antoine Belaieff, Director of Regional Planning, Metrolinx, Toronto

Abstract

Overview of the transportation and land use frameworks in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area as the region continues to experience rapid growth. This includes the provincial Growth Plan as well as the recently adopted 2041 Regional Transportation Plan. The presentation will focus on the approach to integrating land use and transportation planning as Metrolinx transforms the commuter rail system into a frequent, two-way, all-day electrified network, with a quadrupling of the number of daily train trips. This will include the process for identifying new stations, the work underway to catalyse development around stations and to reduce the dependence on parking for station access.

 

Renewing Montreal ’s Governance for Land Development and Value  Capture – One year after the change

  • Dr Ludwig Desjardins, Deputy Director – Strategic planning, funding and fares, The Regional Authority for Metropolitan Transport , ARTM, Montreal

Abstract

 

 

 

Cape Town ’s PTA Story:

Tbc

Abstract

   

12:30

Assembly Closing

   

13:00

Lunch

   

Tuesday Afternoon

Technical Visit - Meeting Gothenburg’s Customers Center

14:00

Meeting point: Riverton hotel reception, Stora Badhusgatan 26, Gothenburg

"Our first stop is the travel center Stenpiren, which was inaugurated in 2016 and has won several awards. We will then take the Älvsnabben ferry to Lindholmen, where we will visit the indoor bus stop at Teknikgatan and learn more about the electric buses in the ElectriCity project. Next, we will take an ElectriCity bus to Lilla Bommen and walk to the iconic lipstick building. This is the venue for our afternoon coffee and a presentation about the plans of building a cable car in Gothenburg".

17:30

End of the Day

 

Registration: 

This is a Public Transport Authorities only event, open to non UITP members -  For registration please contact us: 

Caroline Fabianski, Organising Authorities Committee Senior Manager, caroline.fabianski@uitp.org

and her assistants:

Elisabeth Suciu, Elisabeth.suciu@uitp.org

Faria Khan, faria.khan@uitp.org

Practical information: 

This is a free event, yet limited to 70 persons. It's also open to non UITP members.

The venue is Hotel Riverton

Stora badhusgatan 26
SE- 411 21 Gothenburg
Sweden

http://www.riverton.se/en/

map: http://www.riverton.se/en/contact-and-location.html

Closest stop with public transport: Stenpiren
Västtrafik’s trip planner: https://www.vasttrafik.se/

Speakers: 

  • Our host, Roger Vahnberg Senior Vice President at Västtrafik, Sweden and UITP President of the Organizing Authorities Assembly
  • Jeremy Yap, Deputy Chief Executive, Public Transport, Policy & Planning at LTA/ Singapore, and UITP Organizing Authorities Committee Chairman
  • Mohamed Mezghani, Secretary General, UITP, Brussels, Belgium
  • Tero Anttila, Transport Planning Director, Helsinki Region Transport (HSL), Finland
  • Antoine Belaieff, Director Regional Planning at Metrolinx, Toronto, Canada
  • Lars Backström, President, Västtrafik, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Maria Björner Brauer, Head of Sales and Marketing, Västtrafik, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Tommaso Bonino, Technical Manager, Bologna’s Mobility and Public Transport Agency, SRM, Italy
  • Caroline Cerfontaine, UITP Combined Mobility Manager, Brussels, Belgium
  • Carles Conill Vergés, Director of Sustainable Mobility Services, Director of Sustainable Mobility Services, Metropolitan Area of Barcelona (AMB), Spain
  • Dr. Carlos Dora, Coordinator Public Health and the Environment Department, World Health Organisation, Switzerland
  • Dr. Ludwig Desjardins, Deputy Director – Strategic planning, funding and fares, The Regional Authority for Metropolitan Transport , ARTM, Montreal, Canada
  • Dr. Caroline Fabianski, Senior Manager, UITP Organizing Authorities, Brussels, Belgium
  • Poon Joe Fai, Director, Policy (Bus & International Relations, Land Transport Authority (LTA), Singapore
  • Alan Fedda, Executive Director, Franchise Management for Public Transport Victoria (PTV), Australia 
  • Mette Granberg, Transport Planner, Helsinki Region Transport (HSL), Finland
  • Dr John Hultén, Director, K2, The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport, Lund, Sweden
  • Helena Leustafius, CEO, The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport, Lund, Sweden
  • Mäns Lönnroth, Expert, Volvo Research and Educational Foundation (VREF), Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Prof. Rosario Macario, UITP Consultant, TIS & CERIS – Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
  • Dr. Alexander Paulsson, Researcher, K2, The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport, Lund, Sweden
  • Tom Page, Head of Business Strategy,Transport for London, TfL, United Kingdom
  • Lucy Saunders, Public Health Specialist, Transport for London, TfL, United Kingdom
  • Simon Warburton, Strategy Director, Transport For Greater Manchester (TfGM), United Kingdom

Partners: 

Västtrafik 

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